Sunday, January 19, 2014

THE BEST OF FRANCE. VOL. 2



RAW MILK BUTTER

We buy a lot of butter here,  bulk sized for Victoria's baking and some of the cooking, the odd new find when go to different areas of the country and of course our favorite kind, raw milk butter. 
While raw milk products in North America are still hard to get, if not impossible, here in France the country of really happy cows, you are able to find raw milk butter at the grocery stores. 

I have tried a few from around the Charente area which is well known for it's dairy products, and settled on a brand that I buy at the local market. Made at a Coop of milk suppliers it is hard to believe or describe, but the flavor does change not only from season to season (fresh grass versus hay), but also sometimes in one season. At first I thought that's nuts, I am going butter crazy, but then I read this article . 
http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2012/04/is-raw-milk-worth-it-the-case-of-the-single-udder-butter.html
While I won't seek out single udder butter anytime soon, pasteurizing the crap out of things does make the population safer for sure, but it also destroys flavor and makes all of us dull consumers.
Like Vanilla. Or beige paint. 
Europe is jumping on the wagon as well lately, making sure politicians in Brussels have enough paper to push and create a more uniform, continent wide food supply. They have not touched France too much yet, but one can fear that sooner or later it will happen. 

The longer I am here, the more I realize the things I love about Europe (Versus the things that make me long for the US). And products like raw milk butter, every day staples, is why I am enjoying France.






FROM THE WIDOWS FOUNTAIN COOP

HAS A BAR CODE. WIDELY AVAILABLE


IT TASTES STRONGER AND ADDS A FLAVOR TO YOUR COOKING


CREPES TURN OUT  MORE INTENSE WITH RAW BUTTER


FRESH BUTTER ON TOAST WITH HOME MADE APRICOT JAM

2 comments:

keenast said...

This is stuff dreams are made of ;) The best I can find here (California) is butter from President, and that's difficult. 99% of food available in the US is 'industrial'. The vast majority of consumers is either terribly uneducated about food or doesn't care. Food quality is so much better in Europe (or Japan !) - strongly missed!

H.Peter said...



Bon Jour Karl,

JAPAN! In my stupid years I spent three month in Nagasaki and I have nothing to show for. Too young.
Very much on my list to take the family.